Thursday, October 18, 2007

Introducing Nobel-Winning Racist, Dr. James Watson

Remember Crick and Watson, yes, of DNA fame. That Watson, now head of Cold Springs Harbor Laboratory, which, by the way, was ground zero for the eugenics movement in the early 20th Century. Dr. Watson is spouting off in Britain about the inferiority of black people. What is scary is that Watson feels it now safe to speak so brazenly about his racist views at this point in history, views he has held for many years but was not so open about sharing them.

From Raw Story:

A leading scientific organization Thursday condemned as "racist" and "vicious" remarks by a Nobel Prize-winning US scientist who reportedly said black people are less intelligent than whites.

The Washington-based Federation of American Scientists (FAS) said it was "outraged" by the remarks attributed to James Watson that appeared in Britain's Sunday Times Magazine at the weekend.

"It is tragic that one of the icons of modern science has cast such dishonor on the profession," said FAS president Henry Kelly.

"Dr. Watson chose to use his unique stature to promote personal prejudices that are racist, vicious and unsupported by science," he added, saying it was "a sad and revolting way to end a remarkable career."

Watson won the Nobel prize for medicine in 1962 for his part in discovering the structure of DNA.

The 79-year-old chancellor of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York state is in Britain to promote his new book "Avoid Boring People: Lessons From A Life In Science."

Watson told the Sunday Times he was "inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa" because "all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours -- whereas all the testing says not really."

The British Museum in London revoked a invitation to Watson in the firestorm that followed the remarks, saying through a spokesman that his comments had "gone beyond the point of acceptable debate."

2 comments:

  1. nikto2:40 PM

    Ben Franklin visited a school in France with black children and changed his whole view on that topic after seeing empirical proof that the kids there performed as well as anybody would in that environment.

    It is sad to think a man of the 17th century had a far more advanced mentality than a modern scientist does.

    What's next for Watson--Doubting evolution? Re-deciding the world
    is FLAT?

    Sheesh!

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  2. I have written to Cold Springs to immediately change the name of the Watson School of Biological Sciences. While I cannot refute the man's work, I can certainly make sure that his name is not honored by this institution. I would hope the Cold Springs' alumni would also write demanding that the school's name be immediately changed.

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