"A child's learning is the funtion more of the characteristics of his classmates than those of the teacher." James Coleman, 1972

Friday, March 02, 2007

The Yoke of Constant Testing

If our elected officials were interested in listening to anyone outside the Business Roundtable or the US Chamber of Commerce, they might see that constant testing has no advantage over beating children into a submissive acceptance of their third-world-in-a-first-world fates. In fact, I think you would find large numbers of children quite willing to forego occasional floggings if they could find relief from the drudgery that has turned their schools into militaristic exercises in futility and failure.

It looks as though the British are on the verge of withdrawing here, too:
Thursday, 01 Mar 2007 09:40
The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) has called on the government to remove the "yoke" of national tests.

Commenting after the publication today of the results for key stage three national tests, general secretary Mary Bousted said: "This latest round of yet more statistics from the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) does not help solve the fundamental problems with schooling in England."

She added: "We have become wearily accustomed to this government's 'never mind the quality, feel the width' approach to education."

A review of the curriculum is taking place and government ministers argued it will improve attainment and close the gender gap

Dr Bousted said: "The key stage three review, if allowed to blossom freely, will make schools more interesting for pupils, but would do it far more successfully if the government removed the yoke of constant testing." End of story

Thursday, 01 Mar 2007 09:40 The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) has called on the government to remove the "yoke" of national tests.

Commenting after the publication today of the results for key stage three national tests, general secretary Mary Bousted said: "This latest round of yet more statistics from the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) does not help solve the fundamental problems with schooling in England."

She added: "We have become wearily accustomed to this government's 'never mind the quality, feel the width' approach to education."

A review of the curriculum is taking place and government ministers argued it will improve attainment and close the gender gap

Dr Bousted said: "The key stage three review, if allowed to blossom freely, will make schools more interesting for pupils, but would do it far more successfully if the government removed the yoke of constant testing." End of story

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