"A child's learning is the funtion more of the characteristics of his classmates than those of the teacher." James Coleman, 1972

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Wake County's General Tata Pushing for Resegregation Plan to Be Apporoved Tuesday

The lame duck Tea Partiers who were trounced last week in the Wake County School Board races can't accept the fact that their brand of Jim Crow segregation is not popular, ethical, or even good for business in the Raleigh and Research Triangle, an area that prides itself for its diversity and top-notch schools.

In fact, the resegregationists say they cannot wait for the November 8 run-off to see if a diversity-friendly majority will be returned after the last two years of divisive turmoil instigated by the Tea Party Gang of Five.  Despite voters' mass repudiation of their brand of John Birch politics, the Art Pope puppets have decided to push forward with putting the resegregation plan on Tuesday's agenda.

Eli Broad's superintendent, Gen. Tata, who was hired by Pope's Gang of Five, has now come out in support of putting the plan to a vote on Tuesday, a decision that defies all common sense and will most assuredly certify his future as a non-superintendent of Wake County:
"I think it would be insulting to Anne McLaurin and Carolyn Morrison and Ron Margiotta to say, 'You don't get to finish your term. You don't get to do what you were elected to do,'" Tata said Friday.
So Gen. Tata is keen to honor the voters' wishes from two years ago, but he is unwilling to honor the wishes of voters today, who voted to send his resegregationist pals packing.

We may hope that an awakened electorate will show up on Tuesday to non-violently block his meeting before it starts.  In the meantime, please call Gen. Tata's command post on Monday and Tuesday to see if you can get an answer as to why he cannot accept the fact that Wake County voters have had enough of 1950s Jim Crow education policy: Phone: 919-431-7400.


Wake County school Superintendent Tony Tata said the Board of Education will move forward with a vote Tuesday on the proposed student assignment plan, despite calls by some parents to wait.

In his weekly press briefing, Tata said it is important to seek approval as soon as possible so that parents can begin ranking their school choices in January.

At a public hearing Thursday, some parents asked leaders to delay the vote until new school board members are seated in December. Others asked that three newly elected members be involved now.

The hearing came two days after the election of four Democratic-backed school board candidates. A runoff election for the final seat will be held Nov. 8 and will decide whether the four Republican board members keep their majority or if the four Democratic members gain it.

"I think it would be insulting to Anne McLaurin and Carolyn Morrison and Ron Margiotta to say, 'You don't get to finish your term. You don't get to do what you were elected to do,'" Tata said Friday.

When the new board members take office, parents like Katie Sommers fear the assignment plan won't stick.
“It’s stressful that my son is going to be moving to a new school, and he keeps asking me and everyone keeps asking me, ‘Where is he going next year?’ And I can’t say where, because I don’t know for sure at this point what’s going to happen,” she said.

In 2009, a newly elected majority on the school board threw out a decade-old plan that bused students for socioeconomic diversity. For the past two years, they've been working on a new plan.

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